Andrew Connell

Series: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint

Like many people who get into Silverlight, I quickly caught the bug and enjoyed this technology that allowed me to create robust business applications in the client relatively quickly. Over the last year I spent some time talking about leveraging Silverlight and MVVM with SharePoint 2010 at a few user groups. One thing that surprised me was that many folks in these sessions were under the impression you couldn't use MVVM with SharePoint. It seemed the CSOM or OData/REST piece of the puzzle was confusing to some. Of course you can! In this series, I'm going to talk about a few things related to Silverlight, MVVM and SharePoint. In here I'll talk about a few different challenges I ran into and some techniques I've adopted.

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    Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint - About this Series...

    This post is part of a series on Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint. The other posts in this series can be found here: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint Like many people who get into Silverlight, I quickly caught the bug and enjoyed this technology that allowed me to create robust business applications in the client relatively quickly. With a few months under my belt I then started looking into different development patters and grabbed ahold of the Model-View-View Model (MVVM) design pattern… I shared my experience of how I learned MVVM here .
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    Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint - How I do MVVM

    This post is part of a series on Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint. The other posts in this series can be found here: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint Most of the people I speak to are SharePoint people or those who are getting into SharePoint. I find a good number of them don’t have experience with Silverlight and when I talk to them about this topic (Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint 2010), I get the same questions such as:
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    Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint - My favorite MVVM toolkit : MVVM Light Toolkit

    This post is part of a series on Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint. The other posts in this series can be found here: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint Generally speaking I’m not the type of developer that likes to hitch my wagon to a specific type of toolkit. In the years I’ve spent as an instructor, writer & speaker I’ve developed the opinion to be as vanilla as possible… don’t force someone to jump on board some framework just because you like it.
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    Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint - Working with Commands

    This post is part of a series on Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint. The other posts in this series can be found here: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint Now for one of the coolest capabilities in Silverlight 4 that is only a close second to the rich data binding we have in Silverlight. We’ve all worked with event handlers before in Windows Forms, ASP.NET, Silverlight pre-v4 or other such applications. You know, you specify what the event handler method name is that is tied to by wiring up the Click event of a button.
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    Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint - Working with Messages

    This post is part of a series on Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint. The other posts in this series can be found here: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint Most of the stuff in the MVVM Light Toolkit addresses things to simplify common things you have to deal with such as commands, view models and declaratively binding a new instance of a view model to a view’s data context. One thing that is a “new feature” included in the toolkit is this special class called a Messenger.
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    Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint - Working with Dialogs

    This post is part of a series on Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint. The other posts in this series can be found here: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint One thing I found tricky at first when learning MVVM was how to handle the case of dialogs. They are a fully UX capability but they also were used for things such as creating and editing items. I needed to find a way to get dialogs to appear but without being triggered from the UI rather from the view model, how to handle their actions and how to make all of that stuff fully testable!
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    Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint - Testing the Business Logic

    This post is part of a series on Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint. The other posts in this series can be found here: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint MVVM at it’s core is a design pattern that is a guideline on how to separate your UI from the business logic in XAML based applications. One of the biggest benefits to this is the ability to fully test your application’s business logic because 100% of it does not live in the user interface.
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    Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint - Testing the User Interface

    This post is part of a series on Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint. The other posts in this series can be found here: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint In the previous post in this series I discussed testing the business logic. But there’s another important and critical piece to your application that you can test… the user interface! This is a major piece of the application, so why not test it!
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    Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint - Using Data Services

    This post is part of a series on Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint. The other posts in this series can be found here: Silverlight, MVVM & SharePoint One thing I haven’t discussed at all in this series is getting data from your data source in a Silverlight application. In my reference implementation (RI) I keep referring to in this series (see the overview post for a download link) I’m connecting to SharePoint both through the client side object model (CSOM) and the OData service.